This is an AMI member event - if you are not a member but would like to attend, you can join AMI here for as little as £6 per year.

Dr Christopher Stewart, recipient of AMI's 2023 WH Pierce Prize, is known for his innovative research in the field of microbiome studies, particularly focusing on early human development. His research investigates the intricate relationships between the gut microbiome and the health of preterm infants, emphasising the influence of human milk oligosaccharides on infant gut microbiota. 

This webinar, which brings together experts in this particular area of microbiome research, will further highlight his work's impact, facilitating in-depth discussions and knowledge sharing through an expert panel discussion, research showcases, and an interactive Q&A session. This event underscores Dr Stewart's commitment to enhancing neonatal health care and nutrition strategies, contributing to the broader UN SDGs ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all ages.

SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

Target 3.2 - End Preventable Deaths of Newborns and Children Under 5 Years of Age: Dr Stewart's work on the microbiome in preterm infants, especially his research on human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) and their impact on the gut microbiome, contributes to a better understanding of neonatal health. This research can help in developing strategies to reduce infant mortality and enhance early childhood health.

Target 3.8 - Achieve Universal Health Coverage: His findings can inform healthcare practices and policies, especially in neonatal care, contributing to the goal of universal health coverage with improved outcomes for infants.

SDG 4: Quality Education

Target 4.2 - Ensure Quality Early Childhood Development: Understanding the role of the gut microbiome in early development is crucial for informing educational and health policies that support early childhood development.

SDG 2: Zero Hunger

Target 2.2 - End All Forms of Malnutrition: Insights from his research on the gut microbiome and nutrition in early life could lead to better strategies for nutrition, particularly in the context of breastfeeding and infant formula, thereby contributing to efforts to combat malnutrition.

Keep an eye on this page for more details on the programme and speakers for this event.

Dr Christopher Stewart

Dr Christopher Stewart

Newcastle University, UK

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Professor Meghan Azad

Professor Meghan Azad

University of Manitoba

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Professor Lindsay Hall

Professor Lindsay Hall

University of Birmingham

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Dr Sasirekha Ramani

Dr Sasirekha Ramani

Baylor College of Medicine

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